About Us/ IUOE HAZMAT

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About Us
The IUOE National Training Fund (NTF) – National HAZMAT Program has been training operating engineers, stationary engineers, and other workers since 1987 through cooperative agreements awarded by the National Institute of Environmental Health and Sciences (NIEHS) Worker Training Program. Over almost three decades, the HAZMAT Program has provided safety and health training to over 529,000 workers with over 7.4M training contact hours. This is accomplished by the five components of the HAZMAT Program that make our safety and health training second to none: Training, Curriculum, Evaluation, Support, and Outreach.

The HAZMAT Program has an experienced and qualified cadre of 15 Instructor-Trainers who teach, mentor, and support the Peer IUOE Trainers. Instructor-Trainers design the trainers’ courses based on best practices and adult education models for health and safety training. The overarching principle is simply, “What we do here is what they will do there.” Instructor-Trainers model how the peer training is to be conducted. The five principles taught to the Peer IUOE Trainers about adult education are: 1) peer training and peer involvement are powerful, 2) facilitate learning in groups, 3) encourage problem solving in teams, 4) use hands-on training in a realistic work environment, and 5) promote interaction with experts.
What We Do
The National HAZMAT Program focuses on two categories of courses: Peer IUOE Trainer courses and worker courses. The HAZMAT Program utilizes the train-the-trainer model to train the Peer IUOE Trainers over a five-year cycle. This cycle first develops additional knowledge, experiences, and skills and then builds the trainers’ knowledge base through competency-building courses such as respiratory protection and industrial hygiene. Teaching techniques are a constant focus throughout the cycle to include more participatory and hands-on training so they become the default delivery method when trainers teach the worker courses.

Worker courses are taught by HAZMAT Program staff Instructor-Trainers and Peer IUOE Trainers. HAZMAT Program training emphasizes “empowerment through education” in courses including Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER), OSHA Construction and General Industry Outreach, MSHA Miner, and other safety and health courses.

Every training course offered has a curriculum to support it. The HAZMAT Program maintains a centralized library with 36 total curriculum packages and 34 associated supplementary materials across all of its programs. This centralization of the course materials provides a standardized curriculum across all training programs in the U.S. while offering each trainer the flexibility to customize the materials based on their geographic location and audience. These materials are made available to all Peer IUOE Trainers supported by this program.

Worker courses are taught by HAZMAT Program staff Instructor-Trainers and Peer IUOE Trainers. HAZMAT Program training emphasizes “empowerment through education” in courses including Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER), OSHA Construction and General Industry Outreach, MSHA Miner, and other safety and health courses.
Who Do We Train
Throughout the United States, the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) represents roughly 329,000 workers with approximately 87 local unions. The IUOE is a progressive, diversified trade union that primarily represents working men and women who operate heavy construction equipment such as cranes, bulldozers, pavers, trench excavators, and many other kinds of equipment used for constructing buildings, dams, airports, and highways, and stationary engineers who operate and maintain building and industrial complexes such as hospitals, office buildings, sports arenas, schools, nursing homes, and the like. IUOE also represents stationary engineers who assist on clean-up projects and operate and maintain building complexes at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Such facilities include office buildings, laboratories, boiler plants, maintenance shops, waste storage buildings, and other facilities where processes such as vitrification, gaseous diffusion, transuranic waste processing and waste isolation occur or where uranium enrichment or reactors were once housed.

Operating Engineers also work on EPA Superfund and Brownfield sites, in mining-related industries, in oil refineries and on oil pipelines, on the water with dredges and in the ports of major cities, and they do municipal work with cities and counties including sewer and water treatment plants. They also work in mechanical fields as heavy-duty truck and equipment mechanics and technical engineers or surveyors.

Operating and stationary engineers respond to and may be found at nearly every disaster work site, whether it is a plant explosion, flooding, wildfire, terrorist or other intentional attack. Heavy equipment operators remove collapsed structures to locate possible survivors, remove debris to clear roadways for emergency vehicle access, remove and transport debris to a dumpsite, and help to rebuild any destroyed infrastructure or facilities. Stationary engineers focus on maintaining or recovery of a facility/building infrastructure for full and safe operations. These workers perform tasks that often place them in extreme conditions and hazardous environments.

Our links

  • IUOE
  • National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
  • Occupational Safety and Health Administration
  • Department of Energy
  • Mine Safety and Health Administration
  • American Red Cross
  • Department of Labor
  • Centers for Disease Control
  • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
  • American Industrial Hygiene Association

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